Contact Channel Magazine
Celebrating our 2013 Head Prefects banner

Celebrating our 2013 Head Prefects

At Channel Magazine we love highlighting all that is good on the Shore. We make it our business to highlight the achievements of those in our community. For youngsters it doesn’t get much better than being selected by their Secondary School to be the Head Girl or Head Boy. It is a reward for the hard work and dedication of those students during the years they have attended the school and celebrates their leadership qualities.
In this issue of Channel Magazine we thought our readers deserve to know a little bit more about those students chosen to lead their respective North Shore schools in 2013. Just as the school year got underway in February, Aidan Bennett put these questions to the 2013 Head Boys and Girls of Kristin, Rosmini, Takapuna Grammar, Westlake Boys, Westlake Girls and Pinehurst.


Claudia Brick – Head Girl,
Takapuna Grammar School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head girl at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
CB
: In my time at Takapuna Grammar School I have contributed to many co-curricular activities, as well as taking part in a wide range of extra-curricular sport, music, and service. I like to think that I am a positive role model for younger students and have demonstrated the dedication and commitment required to be head girl through leadership and a great work ethic.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
CB:
Managing to maintain my high academic standards and sport while fulfilling the role of head girl, which has a significant time commitment.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
CB:
Takapuna Grammar School has provided me with opportunities above and beyond any previous expectations. The school encourages and supports students to be involved in many aspects of school life while maintaining extra-curricular interests as well. Obviously my friends here have also played a big part in making school so special.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
CB:
Universal access to healthcare. One billion people in the world today lack access to health care and more people are killed by preventable disease each year than conflict.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
CB:
Good question - that is as yet undecided! I have a wide variety of interests so it is a challenge to narrow it down to a specific career choice. I am looking forward to continuing learning and hopefully that will include the chance to travel and study overseas.


Mark Horner – Head Boy,
Takapuna Grammar School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
MH:
That’s a really difficult question to answer! I feel that I was chosen for the role because I try to be involved in as many different different areas of the school as I can, such as World Vision, PSSP (Peer Sexuality Support Programme), sport, and music.
 
AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
MH:
I’d have to say writing speeches. They’re something that I’ve always found challenging yet satisfying. I also think that trying to fit everything in that I want to achieve this year is going to be difficult.
 
AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
MH:
I love it here! There are so many opportunities for everybody so that no one is ever left out. Also we have a great mix of people and cultures within the school, creating a diverse and interesting atmosphere.
 
AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
MH:
Ooh this is a hard one! I would have to say that other than the obvious (war and poverty) that I would like to change the way that profits are shared. Ideally I feel that all products should be fair trade.
 
AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
MH:
I’d really like to go into engineering either through Auckland or Christchurch. I haven’t decided what strand of engineering I will do yet; I’ll decide that in second year. Also, at some point, I would like to train as a commercial pilot.


James Bishop – Head Boy, Kristin School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
JB:
Thank you, I think that I was chosen by my peers and teachers to lead the school because of my love for Kristin and my dedication during my time here. I have always said yes to any opportunity that has come my way, such as when my close friend Jocelyn Ho asked me to partake in Chinese Flag Dancing, when I was asked to MC a violin recital, and when I coached junior football. I think this involvement over many years put me forward as a candidate for head prefecture. I have always had the ability to build strong personal relationships with all sorts of individuals and when groups come together I find myself being looked up to as the one to make decisions and lead the group. I have always enjoyed being a leader ever since 2007 when my teacher Mrs Sarah Underdown made me Class Captain.
 
AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
JB:
I think the most challenging part of the role will be to manage the pressure of being a role model and leader for the entire student body. As a Head Boy at Kristin I will be heavily involved in the Junior, Middle and Senior Schools and this obviously takes a huge chunk of time in what is already a busy final year of school. It is hard to comprehend that the entire student body is looking to me for leadership and can be motivated by my actions, and although this is a difficult part of the role for me, I feel that it will be one of the most rewarding. I will try to manage the responsibility of leadership by involving myself in as many areas of the school as possible, and in particular through my extra-curricular activities where I am able to develop close friendships with individuals and groups.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
JB:
I truly believe that Kristin School is special because of the people involved in the school. Whether that is students, parents, teachers or administrative staff, each and every individual involved in Kristin goes above and beyond their required role in the school and that’s what makes it such an amazing place to be, day in and day out. Since the day I set foot inside the grounds back in 2004, I have felt that Kristin School is a family. The dedication and enthusiasm from all is why success is regularly achieved in all facets of school life. I have loved my ten years at the school and cannot describe to you the honour and pride I feel to be leading Kristin School in its 40th year alongside Phoebe.
 
AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
JB:
I think I would entirely get rid of negativity in the world. In the words of a young man named Justin Bieber “Never Say Never”. I believe that this speaks wonders for what I am trying to say. For me personally, this desired change is inspired by my Year 9 form teacher, Mr Dennis Brown; he always made an effort in every class to not say the word “don’t” and would consistently stay positive and motivate his students. This meant a lot to me and I feel that if this was achieved on a much larger scale then many of the world’s problems would be solved and the world would be a much happier place for all. A friend of mine, Kiran Patel, recently came back from a family trip to India and he spoke of the happiness that is evident in the slums in India where there are people with next to nothing living happy lives simply because they are positive about the situation that they are in. With this positivity spread worldwide, the world would be a more selfless place and people would work together to make the world a better place.
 
AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
JB:
When I leave school I hope to go to University in Melbourne. I am currently deciding on whether to head for Monash University in Melbourne to study Business and Property or to The University of Melbourne to study Business. With either of these degrees I hope to dabble in the financial sector, investing in projects and in some way giving back to society.


Phoebe Jasper – Head Girl, Kristin School

AB: Congratulation on becoming head girl at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
PJ:
I think, ultimately, my positivity and willingness to get involved gave me the extra edge. I am an extremely energetic person and I love supporting the people around me. I also find myself in lots of different friend groups, which I think helps me to be more approachable, so it means my peers can ask me anything and relate to me.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
PJ:
For me, the most challenging and enjoyable part of the role are bound to be the same. It will be a struggle to keep on top of everything but I hope in the future I can look back and say I really got stuck in and had a lot to do in my final year of school. Time management is always challenge for me, as it is for most teenagers. The leaders at Kristin have a lot to do with the whole school, but the student leadership structure also allows opportunities to talk to Deans and Principals about your struggles, so that will definitely help.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
PJ:
Kristin is an extremely special school, having been there since Kindergarten I have had the full experience. Growing up at this school has been more than I could ever ask for. Kristin has taught me values and habits that I will carry through my whole life, and I will always have somewhere to return to, wherever I end up.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
PJ:
Happiness. The world is so angry and there is so much hate in the world. If everyone can make one person happy a day then I think it would make the world a much better place.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
PJ:
When I leave school I hope to study musical theatre overseas, in England or Melbourne and then perform for the rest of my life. Being a singer and actor, music is extremely important to me, so as long as I can sing and have music then I will be happy. If that doesn’t work out in the next 5 or so years, I plan to be an early childhood educator.



Jesse Medcalf – Head Boy,
Westlake Boys High School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
JM:
I’m an extremely passionate member of the Westlake community, and I pride myself on reaching the potential that Westlake Boys’ encourages every student to achieve. I’ve become fully immersed in Westlake life, and over the last four years I’ve been fortunate to participate in a wide variety of sporting, academic and cultural activities.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
JM:
A big goal for me, and one with its fair share of challenges, is to ensure that every student fulfils their potential. Westlake Boys’ has a proud tradition of excellence, and are constantly improving pass rates across all levels, but it remains a challenge for all students to meet their potential. Our Peer Tutoring, free breakfast and tutoring schemes are making excellent headway in this regard, and I’m keen to see this progress even further this year.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
JM:
Westlake Boys’ has a unique sense of pride and dignity. Whether you’re walking into the magnificent auditorium during assembly, watching the house haka competition, or simply walking around the school grounds, the sense of school pride amongst the boys is pervasive. I think this comes from the way we celebrate excellence with such passion.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
JM:
Positive change comes from each individual’s desire to first reach his or her own potential and then to contribute more effectively to society. If this mind-set was adopted collectively we could all share a more bountiful community.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
JM:
I’m intending to apply to a range of US universities, including some of the ivies and a few others with strong business programs. I hope to study economics and politics, and eventually follow careers in both fields. I want to return to New Zealand for the politics as I think it would be the most effective way for me to improve the lives of all New Zealanders.


Zoe Cronin – Head Girl,
Westlake Girls High School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head girl at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
ZC:
Thank you. Maybe some of the reasons I have been chosen as a head prefect of Westlake Girls High School are that I am a hard worker who strives for personal excellence in all that I do, I love to interact and meet new people, I enjoy taking on new opportunities and challenges, and have a positive attitude.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
ZC:
Time management will be a challenging factor this year. Finding a balance between my huge commitment with sport as well as finding time to study, write assignments, and be one of the main figures helping lead the school - it will be a challenge, but one I am looking forward to. I will come across many minor challenges throughout the year, however I have great staff behind me, and a supportive prefect team surrounding me, so any challenges faced will be able to be shared and overcome.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
ZC:
I believe my school is special as it provides a place for all students to grow and develop confidently into leaders. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at Westlake; it has provided me with numerous opportunities with my studies as well as sport. I look forward to this year with a new house system helping generate even better school spirit, whilst providing a great support network for girls within the school allowing them to make lifelong friends. Westlake is a school that sets high standards, producing young ladies with qualifications, talents and core values that will help them be successful in life.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
ZC:
I realize this question only says one thing however as a leader I would love to change many things to make New Zealand as well as other countries all around the world a better place. Some things I would change are - prison penalties would become harsher, poverty and child abuse.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
ZC:
I am unsure whether I want to attend university or take a gap year next year. I like to focus on the present and make the most of each opportunity that comes my way rather than focusing on the future too much. Possible options at this stage include pursuing a sports scholarship overseas to continue my involvement in volleyball, studying communications at AUT, or working toward a career as a sports journalist, something that I would be very passionate and interested in.


Jack Timings – Head Boy, Rosmini College

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
JT:
I think I was chosen for the Head Boy role because of my involvement in all parts of the school. I am heavily involved in school music, mainly as a classical singer but also as a trombone player, I have been playing sport for the school since I first started in Year 7 in both soccer and tennis, and I have demonstrated good academic ability as well. In the words of our principal Mr Gerrard: “Rosmini College prides itself on producing well rounded young men.”

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
JT:
It will be hard to continue the legacy of the outstanding Head Boys that the school has had every year, each making their mark on the school. I look forward to the challenge of helping make Rosmini College as great as I can in my own way.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
JT:
Our school is special because of the Catholic values and teachings that permeate all parts of the school whether they are academic, sporting or cultural. The good values that the students here are taught to use and live by create a strong sense of brotherhood in the school, which I believe is the greatest part of the school. Age, size, ability, everyone is equal at Rosmini College and that is something we pride ourselves on.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
JT:
For most people, life in New Zealand is pretty fantastic. But some people, in both New Zealand and around the world, are not so fortunate. There are people living in poverty, with corruption, and without rights and freedoms. These global issues are not simply going to go away in one lifetime, nor are they problems a lone leader can defeat. The world needs massive changes and it is unrealistic to assume that we can make such a difference on our own. But if everyone plays their part, change can happen. More personally, a realistic change I would like to help progress is the treatment of Type 1 diabetes in the world today. As a diabetic myself I want to help those in my position live as normal a life as possible and to be able to have the best control over their condition that they can. I believe that with the progress that has been made already, we could see incredible results in the next 10-20 years.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
JT: After the year is over, I would very much like to study Engineering and Music Performance, preferably at Auckland. After that, I’m not quite sure.


Ben Curran – Head Boy, Rosmini College

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
BC:
I try to always be driven and determined. During my 6 years at Rosmini, I have channelled my energy and dedication into many pursuits in the classroom and on the sports field and now I have been given the opportunity to apply my experience to the wider school community I now know so well.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
BC:
Year 13 traditionally has an academic focus, and this has always been important to me. I hope to be able to balance my enthusiasm for my new role with my commitment to study and other personal endeavours.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
BC:
It has been incredible to absorb the spirit of Rosmini during all my years at the school. Rosmini College has always prided itself on producing well-rounded men. The teachers, Old Boys and leadership bodies work to create a sense of family, and it is so satisfying to be one of the senior students now helping to create this culture for the younger boys.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
BC:
In a perfect world, everyone would have a basic standard of living, and have their natural rights recognised. Food, education and hygienic shelter are desirable for everyone. It is scary to think that this may never be achieved, but therein presents our generation’s challenge.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
BC:
At the moment I intend to study Commerce and Law, possibly at The University of Auckland or maybe further afield. I’ll see where this year takes me.



Jake McGregor – Head Boy,
Pinehurst School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head boy at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
JM:
I have been attending Pinehurst for the past 6 years, and have always tried my hardest to be an integral part of the school community, assisting in organising various projects, taking part in events such as school plays, speech competitions and sports days, and serving on a variety of councils including academic, citizenship, and environmental.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
JM:
One of our aims as a prefect committee this year is to encourage greater participation in house events, and building a greater sense of school spirit. I feel that motivating the student body, and indeed the staff and parent community as well has the potential to be rather challenging initially, but I am confident that we will make headway throughout the year.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
JM:
It has provided a safe, friendly environment where I can be confident expressing myself whilst pursuing my own interests and learning in a fashion that suits me best – the small class sizes allow the teachers to focus more on the individual students. This is something that I have responded well to.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
JM:
I would change the basic principles of politics, whereby instead of being concerned with what benefits them, politicians would instead pursue policies that benefit the public and the country they serve.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
JM:
Although I intend to pursue my interests in performing arts, I will also be attending university, where I hope to follow a career in broadcasting, or else in history.


Megan Woodhead – Head Girl, Pinehurst School

AB: Congratulations on becoming the head girl at your school. Why do you think you were chosen for the role?
MW:
Though I have only been at the school for two years it has had such a great impact on me, and I’ve always felt I’ve needed to give back in some way. I became involved in as many school activities as possible; events, house activities, and competitions. I also worked hard to become a part of the Scholars Academy, joined the Citizenship Council, and attended the NZ Model United Nations. I suppose in showing an eagerness to get involved wherever possible and to contribute to the school, I also showed the qualities that deemed me fit for the role. It is such an honour to have been chosen.

AB: What is going to be the most challenging part of the role for you?
MW:
I believe that trying to bring about change, however small; will always be met with some degree of confrontation. This is always challenging for both parties involved especially as there are so many ideas our prefect body would love to bring to fruition this year.

AB: Why is your school so special, you have obviously enjoyed your time there?
MW:
Pinehurst has enabled me to grow in all aspects of my life and learning. It is such a supportive and friendly environment where all students are given the opportunity to excel, not only academically, but in all areas.

AB: You are obviously a leader. If there was one thing you could change in the world what would that be?
MW:
Peoples’ inability to accept one another’s differences, whether this be race, religion, gender or sexual orientation. I believe acceptance of others is of utmost importance if we seek any degree of peace in the future.

AB: What do you intend to do when you leave school?
MW:
I am currently interested in doing a degree in communications at AUT, possibly majoring in journalism. Hopefully I will be able to pursue my interests in photography as well. However I’m also interested in political science and fine art so nothing is definite.

by Channel Editorial

Advertisements

books@devonportwharf
qpc
paperplustaka